Can You Afford One Sleepless Night? Whitehorse Nuit Blanche Is The Reason To Do It

If you want to immerse in the works of art, then you need more than 1-2 hours or at least a night. Whitehorse Nuit Blanche 2016 is happening this weekend to give you a full night of artistic experience where you will see 10 diverse Yukon and international visual, dance, music, and theatre artists enchant Whitehorse with new performance, multi-disciplinary, participatory, and site-specific works.

Whitehorse Nuit Blanche or also known as WNB is happening on Solstice weekend. The event will start at 7 PM on Saturday (June 18) and end on Sunday at 7 AM. A free breakfast will be served at 11am Sunday, June 19 at l’AFY.

For full schedule, maps, and tickets, please go to www.whitehorsenuitblanche.com

Magnetic North Theatre Festival Brings Entertainment, Excitement, and Talent

Canada’s Magnetic North Theatre Festival 2016 is finally here in Whitehorse. It is a great mingle of local and national artists. The festival has planned many 10-day long events which include:-

Legend Has It
(Spontaneous Theatre (Toronto/Calgary). Co-presented by Yukon Arts Centre)

Pop-Up Love Party
(Zuppa Theatre Co., Halifax)

We Are Not Alone
(A 2b theatre company (Halifax) Production. Created by Crow’s Theatre and Segal Centre for Performing Arts)

Theatre in the Bush
(Ramshackle Theatre, Whitehorse)

LANDLINE: Whitehorse to Ottawa
(xosecret, Secret Theatre, Halifax)

Concord Floral
(Suburban Beast, Toronto)

Prophecy Fog
(Paper Canoe Projects, Toronto)

Town Criers
(Theatre Replacement, Vancouver. Co-presented by Yukon Arts Centre)

My Brain Is Plastic
(Whitehorse Independent Theatre, Whitehorse)

Dogtown: the Musical
(Nakai Theatre and Yukon Circus Society, Whitehorse)

Map of the Land, Map of the Stars
(Gwaandak Theatre, Whitehorse)

Tomboy Survival Guide
(Ivan Coyote, Whitehorse. Presented by Yukon Arts Centre.)

NDP – Yukon will select its federal candidate for Yukon on July 7th

NDP Nomination candidates André Bourcier and Melissa Atkinson

Whitehorse (June 4, 2015) – The NDP’s federal riding association for Yukon has announced that its members will assemble on Tuesday, July 7th to choose their candidate for the upcoming federal campaign. Candidates André Bourcier and Melissa Atkinson both launched their campaigns this month; Yukoners with active memberships as of Sunday, June 7th will be eligible to vote in the nomination campaign.

André Bourcier
André Bourcier | Photo: Submitted

“A contested nomination between two high calibre candidates is a strong sign that Yukoners are looking for a change,” said Yukon riding association president Dan Bader. “I am so excited to watch André and Melissa show Yukoners what kind of candidate they would be over the coming weeks.”

Melissa Atkinson
Melissa Atkinson | Photo: Submitted

The NDP-Yukon media-release related to this announcement said, “NDP leader Tom Mulcair is running on a platform of affordability and progressive steps to make life better for Yukoners. From more affordable, $15-a-day child care to a national inquiry on missing and murdered Aboriginal women to repealing Bill C-51 and the non-negotiated clauses in Bill S-6, an NDP government would turn the page on decades of Liberal and Conservative inaction”.

“Neither the Liberal nor the Conservative candidates represent the change Yukoners want to see in Ottawa, added Bader. “Yukoners have a choice in the upcoming federal campaign – and under Tom Mulcair and the NDP, we have the chance to make positive change in Ottawa.”

Sunset at Tagish, Yukon, Canada.

Sunset at Tagish, Yukon, Canada. Photo submitted by: Kit Logan Wells

Tagish is a small community in the Yukon, Canada. It is about 30 kilometers east of Carcross, Yukon on the Tagish Road at the northern end of Tagish Lake.

In 1898, the gold seekers of the Klondike Gold Rush travelled from all over the world to Dawson City through the heart of Tagish.

Stunning beauty of Lake Laberge, Yukon, Canada

Lake Laberge, Yukon, Canada | Photo by: Gurdeep Pandher
Lake Laberge, Yukon, Canada | Photo by: Gurdeep Pandher
Lake Laberge, Yukon, Canada | Photo by: Gurdeep Pandher
Lake Laberge, Yukon, Canada | Photo by: Gurdeep Pandher
Lake Laberge, Yukon, Canada | Photo by: Gurdeep Pandher
Lake Laberge, Yukon, Canada | Photo by: Gurdeep Pandher
Lake Laberge, Yukon, Canada | Photo by: Gurdeep Pandher
Lake Laberge, Yukon, Canada | Photo by: Gurdeep Pandher
Lake Laberge, Yukon, Canada | Photo by: Gurdeep Pandher
Lake Laberge, Yukon, Canada | Photo by: Gurdeep Pandher
Lake Laberge, Yukon, Canada | Photo by: Gurdeep Pandher
Lake Laberge, Yukon, Canada | Photo by: Gurdeep Pandher
Lake Laberge, Yukon, Canada | Photo by: Gurdeep Pandher

Lake Laberge is a widening of the Yukon River north of Whitehorse, Yukon in Canada. It is fifty kilometres long and ranges from two to five kilometres wide. It is about 30-40 minutes drive from the city of Whitehorse. Its water is always very cold, and its weather often harsh and suddenly variable. Photos: Gurdeep Pandher

Another Yukon Beauty: Pelly River

Another Yukon Beauty: Pelly River | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher

The Pelly river of the Yukon originates west of the Mackenzie Mountains and flows 530 km (329 miles) long through the south central Yukon. The Pelly has two main tributaries, the Ross and Macmillan rivers.

The river was named by Robert Campbell in honour of Sir John Henry Pelly, governor of the Hudson’s Bay Company. The restored Hudson’s Bay Company trading post of Fort Selkirk is at the juncture of the Pelly and Yukon Rivers.

A photo that tells Dawson City’s golden past!

This photo tells many stories! Photo: Gurdeep Pandher

This copy of the Dawson Daily News decorates the cabin of the Yukon’s famous poet Robert W. Service in Dawson City. The paper stays on his personal writing desk in the cabin, it brings back many memories of the famous Gold Rush era. It tells many stories about Dawson’s life, culture, and much more.

Under the main headline “Klondike’s Gold Output Now Leaping Up” and subheading “Yield this year estimated at $5,500,000″; it tells more, “Big increase over the yield of last year. Total gold shipments from Dawson, embracing yield from the various nearby camps reaches the magnificent sum of $164,000,000. More new creeks being opened. Klondike only old camp steadily increasing in output. Vast deposits and modern equipment bringing up the yield. Splendid showing for the fifteenth anniversary of the biggest strike world ever knew.”

A wonder-town in Photos: This place has everything to offer!

Some just call it a nature-town and some call it their whole life. Those who live here permanently are blessed and those who lived here previously are either nostalgic or feel proud of that they were here before. Remoteness of this country helped many to sparkle their inner creativity to the best. Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
Some just call it a nature-town and some call it their whole life. Those who live here permanently are blessed and those who lived here previously are either nostalgic or feel proud of that they were here before. Remoteness of this country helped many to sparkle they inner creativity to the best. Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
Some just call it a nature-town and some call it their whole life. Those who live here permanently are blessed and those who lived here previously are either nostalgic or feel proud of that they were here before. Remoteness of this country helped many to sparkle their inner creativity to the best. Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
Thick and green forest around the town is like a cozy nest to the residents. Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
Thick and green forest around the town is like a cozy nest to the residents. Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
Flowers and flags welcome everyone outside Whitehorse's main recreational facility called Canada Games Centre: Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
Flowers and flags welcome everyone outside Whitehorse’s main recreational facility called Canada Games Centre: Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
An aerial view of mesmerizing Yukon river waters. Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
An aerial view of mesmerizing Yukon river waters. Photo: Gurdeep Pandher

The Brass Knucklers are all set to perform on Wednesday

The Brass Knuckle band playing in Atlin, BC. Photo: Gurdeep Pandher

The Brass Knuckle Society members create hypnotizing music. Jesse Whitehead plays trumpet, Thibaut Rondel plays alto saxophone, Will Hegsted is on tenor saxophone, Kristen Range is an accordion player, Wiliam Auclair Bellemare plays tuba, Josh Regnier is on drums, and Colleen McCarthy is a trombone player. The band is performing this Wednesday at Old Fire Hall in Whitehorse at 7:00 PM. This is the last show of the group. So, don’t miss!

The Spell of the Yukon – A Poem by Robert W. Service

Emerald Lake, Carcross, Yukon. Photo: Gurdeep Pandher

A Poem by Robert W. Service

I wanted the gold, and I sought it;
I scrabbled and mucked like a slave.
Was it famine or scurvy—I fought it;
I hurled my youth into a grave.
I wanted the gold, and I got it—
Came out with a fortune last fall,—
Yet somehow life’s not what I thought it,
And somehow the gold isn’t all.

No! There’s the land. (Have you seen it?)
It’s the cussedest land that I know,
From the big, dizzy mountains that screen it
To the deep, deathlike valleys below.
Some say God was tired when He made it;
Some say it’s a fine land to shun;
Maybe; but there’s some as would trade it
For no land on earth—and I’m one.

You come to get rich (damned good reason);
You feel like an exile at first;
You hate it like hell for a season,
And then you are worse than the worst.
It grips you like some kinds of sinning;
It twists you from foe to a friend;
It seems it’s been since the beginning;
It seems it will be to the end.

I’ve stood in some mighty-mouthed hollow
That’s plumb-full of hush to the brim;
I’ve watched the big, husky sun wallow
In crimson and gold, and grow dim,
Till the moon set the pearly peaks gleaming,
And the stars tumbled out, neck and crop;
And I’ve thought that I surely was dreaming,
With the peace o’ the world piled on top.

The summer—no sweeter was ever;
The sunshiny woods all athrill;
The grayling aleap in the river,
The bighorn asleep on the hill.
The strong life that never knows harness;
The wilds where the caribou call;
The freshness, the freedom, the farness—
O God! how I’m stuck on it all.

The winter! the brightness that blinds you,
The white land locked tight as a drum,
The cold fear that follows and finds you,
The silence that bludgeons you dumb.
The snows that are older than history,
The woods where the weird shadows slant;
The stillness, the moonlight, the mystery,
I’ve bade ’em good-by—but I can’t.

There’s a land where the mountains are nameless,
And the rivers all run God knows where;
There are lives that are erring and aimless,
And deaths that just hang by a hair;
There are hardships that nobody reckons;
There are valleys unpeopled and still;
There’s a land—oh, it beckons and beckons,
And I want to go back—and I will.

They’re making my money diminish;
I’m sick of the taste of champagne.
Thank God! when I’m skinned to a finish
I’ll pike to the Yukon again.
I’ll fight—and you bet it’s no sham-fight;
It’s hell!—but I’ve been there before;
And it’s better than this by a damsite—
So me for the Yukon once more.

There’s gold, and it’s haunting and haunting;
It’s luring me on as of old;
Yet it isn’t the gold that I’m wanting
So much as just finding the gold.
It’s the great, big, broad land ’way up yonder,
It’s the forests where silence has lease;
It’s the beauty that thrills me with wonder,
It’s the stillness that fills me with peace.

Source: The Best of Robert Service (1953)