Depth-of-Field, Your Creative Tool

Depth-of-Field – Your Creative Tool

The creative use of Depth-of-Field (DOF) has been a journey of discovery, wonder and artistic joy for me my entire photographic career.

Even now, after many years of working with film, then digital cameras, it never ceases to amaze me what a huge difference the choice of how to use this technique makes to a photograph.

Learning to use DOF creatively to generate artistic impressions of the scenes and subjects you deal with is one of the most exciting discoveries you will have in photography.

Extreme Depth-of-Field example
Extreme Depth-of-Field example

Depth-of-Field is described as the distance within which everything is in focus. Think of having everything from 2 metres away to 10 metres away in focus, and nothing else; those 8 metres are the depth-of-field.

DOF is dependent on the aperture, focal length of your lens, distance the camera is from the subject and distance between the subject and the background.

Aperture, the opening in the lens, is measured in f/stops; the smaller the aperture, the larger the f/stop is numbered. For example, f/22 is a very small opening while f/2.8 has the lens almost completely opened.

Lenses with shorter focal lengths allow for a greater DOF than do longer focal lengths; the reason landscape photographers use wide angle lenses and hyperfocal distance in their work. This way they get the detail in the foreground in focus as well as the trees and hills in the background.

Hyperfocal distance is the closest distance you can be focus and still keep objects at infinity in acceptable sharpness. It changes with different f/stops.

Set your digital camera on aperture priority or use it in manual mode to gain control of the f/stop.

Using small apertures cuts the amount of light travelling through the lens and creates a need for longer shutter speeds.

Use your tripod.

Shallow Depth-of-Field example
Shallow Depth-of-Field example

Let’s take a look at the opposite end of the DOF spectrum; having a very short distance in focus. Portraiture is one photographic style where this comes into play often.

The closer your subject is to you and the further away the background is from your subject, the easier it is to have your subject in sharp focus while allowing the background to go out of focus.

Shallow DOF can create an image where the beautiful face of your child is in sharp focus while the background is blurry. This effect makes the portrait stand out from everything else.

Wide angle lenses are not usually used for portraiture as you have to get in very close to your subject causing facial distortion, and even wide open they still have quite a wide DOF.

Focal lengths of 50 to 85 are the norm for portraiture, allowing some distance between you and your subject and providing the capacity for a minimal DOF so you can create that wonderful bokeh – the blurry out of focus area of your photo.

The quality of the bokeh differs with each lens, lighting situation and any sharp highlights that may be in the background.

The more blades a lens has to control aperture, the better the bokeh. Their shape and the opening they create also impact on how it is displayed.

Lenses with large apertures allow for the shortest DOF so can be very versatile in doing close-up work. The wider the f/stop, the easier to separate the background from the item you want enhanced.

Longer lenses offer an opportunity to create a portrait while you are still some distance away from your subject. They may, however, cause some distortion.

However, long lenses are useful in photographing sports.

We’ve all seen the images of a football player making the great catch and it seems he is the only thing in the photo as the crowd and all the other players have been lost in the blurry background.

This is created with a very long lens and large aperture.

Take this information to use your digital camera to its utmost by experimenting with the creative use of depth-of-field. You won’t be disappointed.

If you have comments or questions post them in the comment section below.

I look forward to hearing from you.

Happy shooting and remember to leave the environment as you found it.

Norm Hamilton
normhamilton.ca/photography
norm@normhamilton.ca

Photos: The BIG Band’s Silver Anniversary Dance

The BIG Band's Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band's Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band’s Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band's Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band’s Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band's Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band’s Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band's Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band’s Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band's Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band’s Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band's Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band’s Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band's Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band’s Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band's Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band’s Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band's Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band’s Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band's Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band’s Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band's Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band’s Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band's Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band’s Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band's Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band’s Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band's Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band’s Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band's Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band’s Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band's Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band’s Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band's Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band’s Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band's Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band’s Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band's Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band’s Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band's Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band’s Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band's Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band’s Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band's Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band’s Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band's Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band’s Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band's Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band’s Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band's Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band’s Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band's Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band’s Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band's Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band’s Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band's Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band’s Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band's Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band’s Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band's Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band’s Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band's Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band’s Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band's Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band’s Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band's Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band’s Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band's Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band’s Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band's Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band’s Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band's Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band’s Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band's Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band’s Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band's Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band’s Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band's Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band’s Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band's Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band’s Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band's Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band’s Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band's Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band’s Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band's Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band’s Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band's Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band’s Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band's Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band’s Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band's Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band’s Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band's Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band’s Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band's Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band’s Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band's Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band’s Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band's Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band’s Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band's Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band’s Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band's Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band’s Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band's Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band’s Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band's Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
The BIG Band’s Silver Anniversary Dance | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher

Yukon’s Big Band organized its silver anniversary dance at Mount MacIntyre Recreation Centre on May 23, 2015. An estimated 200 people gathered to enjoy elegant music and dancing. Local famous singers Fawn Fritzen and Rebekah Bell entertained the audience for 5 hours.

Three Steps to Sharper Photos

These three steps result in sharper photosAre your digital photos not as sharp as you’d like? Have you wondered why? Let’s consider the three most common causes.

  • Poor focus
  • Subject movement
  • Camera shake

Canada Goose at Quamichan Lake near Duncan, B.C.Poor focus. Take an extra second or two to check that the emphasis of the camera’s auto-focus is on the subject. Sometimes another part of the frame catches their attention.

Tie ring at Transfer Beach, Ladysmith, BC
This image was hand held with a VR Lens and high shutter speed. If I had been a couple of inches closer I would have lost the sharpness.

Make sure you are not too close to if you want the image to be tack-sharp or your camera may not focus clearly. This is true in all cases unless your lens is a true macro lens.

A second source of soft photos, subject blur, happens when the person or thing you want to capture is moving faster than the digital camera can record it. Low light that calls for slow shutter speeds is often the cause.

Fast shutter speeds stop motion. The faster your subject is moving, the faster the shutter speed needs to be. So how do you increase manage that? You need more light.

In most circumstances you cannot increase ambient light so you can add flash, raise the ISO or increase lens’ aperture. Flash provides its own quick light while the latter two will allow you to use faster shutter speeds. Again, the quicker the shutter speed the more likelihood your subject is caught without movement. (Future posts will explain flash photography and controlling exposure with ISO, F/stops and shutter speed)

The general rule is set your shutter speed higher than the reciprocal of the focal length of your lens. Trust me, it’s not as complicated as it sounds.

When shooting with a 50 mm lens keep your shutter speed faster than 1/60th of a second. Similarly, with a 100 mm lens, your shutter speed ought to be 1/125th of a second or more and with a 200mm lens, 1/250th of a second or more.

Camera shake. Ah, yes, the bane of all photographers. Simply put, this is movement of the digital camera during exposure. The tiniest shiver during the split second when the shutter is open can result in a soft image.

When shooting, grasp your camera in both hands, cradling it close to your body. Keep your elbows in close, resting against your body. If possible, race yourself against a solid object such as a wall, a signpost or a tree. A tripod is your best friend. It is the one tool guaranteed to improve your images.

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Taken in a dark rain forest. I set the camera on the ground for stabilization.

Many digital cameras have a mirror-up and remote release feature. This eliminates vibration caused by mirror movement. One caveat: remember to turn off vibration reduction features when using a tripod.

Many digital cameras, or their lenses, have a feature that reduces vibration is known as VR, IS, OS or another notation, depending on your camera manufacturer. This reduces camera shake but will not eliminate it entirely. Nor will it reduce blur caused by your subject’s movement or poor focus.

Now that we’ve mentioned them, the difference between a mediocre lens and a piece of high-quality optics is reflected in both sharpness and cost. Keep your expenses lower by using prime lenses. They are usually less pricey than their zoom counterparts.

Each lens has what is commonly known as its “sweet spot” – usually a couple of stops down from maximum aperture. Try f/5.6 or f/8. (Maximum aperture is where the f-stop number is smallest.)

Lenses and sensors benefit from a thorough periodic cleaning. If you’re uncomfortable cleaning your sensor, have a reputable technician tidy it for you.

My suggestion? Get a tripod, take your time and enjoy making tack-sharp photos.

Norm Hamilton
normhamilton.ca/photography
norm@normhamilton.ca

Resolution And Digital Photography

How important is resolution to digital photography?
How many megapixels is enough?

An article on “The New Camera” website titled, Megapixel Monsters Coming in 2015 discusses the new Canon and Nikon 46 megapixel sensors that are expected this year.

Sigma first introduced its SD-1 flagship camera with a 46 megapixel image sensor in 2010. (4800 x 3200 pixels in three layers.

I’m not one that believes you need the latest and greatest of electronic gadgetry to create exceptional photos. Most marketing is designed to generate a desire for higher megapixels and auto everything. But does that serve you, or the manufacturer’s bottom line?

Ask yourself what you need. Will you use all the features of the higher priced systems? Or are your shots for emailing, putting on social networks and make the odd 4×6 inch print?

For the latter it takes very little resolution so a simple, low cost system may suit you best. If you regularly make large prints, a higher end Digital Single Lens Reflex (DSLR) camera may be preferable.

I’ve made excellent digital images and prints to 8×10 inches with a 15-year-old, 3-megapixel pocket camera. See image below as an example.

Scene on the Haines Road by Norm Hamilton, Photographer

Damien Tremblay, a talented Yukon landscape photographer I know, used to work with an old, 10-megapixel camera and a 50mm lens as his main equipment. He regularly produced fine art quality 16×24 inch prints. He now uses a Sony NEX-5 that can easily print 20×30 pieces.

My current system, Sigma SD15, is inexpensive (comparatively speaking), a few years old, has 4.7 megapixels (effective 14.1), and prints to 20×30 inches beautifully. The bee photo in the header and the hummingbird photo below show the detail, colour and depth possible with the Sigma system.

Anna's Hummingbird by Norm Hamilton, Photographer

I also have a Sony NEX-6 for those times with low light or when I need a pocketable camera. See the puppies for an example from this 16.1MP mirrorless camera.

Puppies photo by Norm Hamilton, Photographer

Consider your needs before you choose your equipment, you don’t need to break the bank to make great images. Remember, a camera is of use only when it’s with you — so keep one within reach. (The reason I have the NEX-6)

Norm Hamilton
normhamilton.ca/photography
norm@normhamilton.ca

The Importance of Composition in Digital Photography

Community Beach seawalk in Parksville, BC

What makes an image memorable?

Sharpness? Exposure? Capturing the moment? All these may be important to the success of your photo but there is one thing that sets a great photo apart from the rest—composition.

In layman’s terms that means

• Don’t drop your main subject into the middle of the frame. Instead, use the “rule of thirds.” Divide your frame into thirds, both horizontally and vertically and then place the focal point of your main subject at one of the spots where the lines intersect.
• Place your subject where it has the most impact. Embed it into the heart and mind of the viewer.
• Curves and lines can draw attention into your creation. Find converging lines, a winding path, look for the flow of direction from foreground to background.

Let the "rule of thirds" improve your photography.Even in the movies, the main subject is usually set off to one side or the other, making the framing more interesting.

A subject that is taller than wide may be more intriguing in the same orientation. You may wish to change your orientation from horizontal to vertical (i.e. landscape to portrait). Conversely, using the opposing orientation may help to include more of the surrounding and tell a greater story.

Portraits are a good example of this. Shot horizontally with the subject smack in the middle of the frame is the hallmark of the snapshot. Turn your camera to the portrait position, move closer to your model, and capture them. Or, as mentioned above, place them according to the “rule of thirds” in a horizontal image and include a background or objects that help the viewer know them better. (I’ll say more on portraits in another post)

Norm Hamilton is a photographer who, after 40 years in Yukon, is living in Duncan, BC.Photography is an artistic form of self-expression. The creation of an image is a rewarding and pleasurable experience in itself; more than just a recording of events.

Take time to move around your subject. View and feel the light and shadows; find the best angle. Set your subject to one of the points from the “rule of thirds.” Then shoot and share the results.

Oh, did I mention the “rule of thirds?”

Norm Hamilton
normhamilton.ca/photography
norm@normhamilton.ca

 

 

 

Photos from Dawson City discovery days parade

Start of discovery days parade in front of Palace Grand in Dawson City | Photo: Ben Sanders
Dawson City mayor Wayne Potoroka on a sweet ride during the discovery days parade | Photo: Ben Sanders
Dawson City mayor Wayne Potoroka on a sweet ride during the discovery days parade | Photo: Ben Sanders
Start of discovery days parade in front of Palace Grand in Dawson City | Photo: Ben Sanders
Start of discovery days parade in front of Palace Grand in Dawson City | Photo: Ben Sanders

In August of 1896, George Carmack, Dawson Charlie and Skookum Jim discovered gold in what is now called Bonanza Creek. After this discovery, nearly 100,000 people attempted to reach the Klondike gold fields to find gold. Therefore, the discover day week is celebrated every year in the month of august to commemorate their great discovery.

Photos: Tombstone Territorial Park, Yukon, Canada

Tombstone Territorial Park | Photo: Zak Smart
Hoary Marmot at Tombstone Territorial Park, Yukon | Photo: Zak Smart
Hoary Marmot at Tombstone Territorial Park, Yukon | Photo: Zak Smart

Tombstone is a Yukon territorial park which is located in central Yukon, near the southern end of the Dempster Highway. Established in 1999, the Tombstone Territorial Park has always been a part of the cultural and traditional lands of the Inuit and First Nation people of the Yukon.

Sunset at Tagish, Yukon, Canada.

Sunset at Tagish, Yukon, Canada. Photo submitted by: Kit Logan Wells

Tagish is a small community in the Yukon, Canada. It is about 30 kilometers east of Carcross, Yukon on the Tagish Road at the northern end of Tagish Lake.

In 1898, the gold seekers of the Klondike Gold Rush travelled from all over the world to Dawson City through the heart of Tagish.

Photo: Chadden Lake, Whitehorse, Yukon

Chadden Lake, Whitehorse, Yukon | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
Chadden Lake, Whitehorse, Yukon | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
Chadden Lake, Whitehorse, Yukon | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
Chadden Lake, Whitehorse, Yukon | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
Chadden Lake, Whitehorse, Yukon | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher

Chadden Lake is another Yukon beauty which is very close to the city of Whitehorse. It is reached from the Chadburn Lake Road in the Riverdale subdivision, across the bridge from downtown Whitehorse.

Stunning beauty of Lake Laberge, Yukon, Canada

Lake Laberge, Yukon, Canada | Photo by: Gurdeep Pandher
Lake Laberge, Yukon, Canada | Photo by: Gurdeep Pandher
Lake Laberge, Yukon, Canada | Photo by: Gurdeep Pandher
Lake Laberge, Yukon, Canada | Photo by: Gurdeep Pandher
Lake Laberge, Yukon, Canada | Photo by: Gurdeep Pandher
Lake Laberge, Yukon, Canada | Photo by: Gurdeep Pandher
Lake Laberge, Yukon, Canada | Photo by: Gurdeep Pandher
Lake Laberge, Yukon, Canada | Photo by: Gurdeep Pandher
Lake Laberge, Yukon, Canada | Photo by: Gurdeep Pandher
Lake Laberge, Yukon, Canada | Photo by: Gurdeep Pandher
Lake Laberge, Yukon, Canada | Photo by: Gurdeep Pandher
Lake Laberge, Yukon, Canada | Photo by: Gurdeep Pandher
Lake Laberge, Yukon, Canada | Photo by: Gurdeep Pandher

Lake Laberge is a widening of the Yukon River north of Whitehorse, Yukon in Canada. It is fifty kilometres long and ranges from two to five kilometres wide. It is about 30-40 minutes drive from the city of Whitehorse. Its water is always very cold, and its weather often harsh and suddenly variable. Photos: Gurdeep Pandher

In Photos: Dawson City Music Festival | All Photos by: Gurdeep Pandher

Alex Cuba

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The 36th annual Dawson City Music Festival held on July 18-20, 2014 under the midnight sun in the beautiful town of Dawson City, Yukon. Despite intermittent raining and winds, it was a busy and warm festival. This music festival  is a much-loved cultural event in the Yukon since 1979.

This years, artists and bands like Alex Cuba, Andy Shauf, Baby Eagle, By Divine Right, Canyon Mountain, Cousins, Cris Derksen, DIANA, Diyet, Driftwood Holly, Evening Hymns, Feeding Frenzy, Jaffa Road, Jaron Freeman-Fox, Les sœurs Boulay (The Boulay Sisters), Marine Dreams, MonkeyJunk, Nick Ferrio, Noosa x OneMillion (Noosa Al-Sarraj), Pharis and Jason, The Midnight Sons, The Naysayers, The Rural Alberta Advantage performed at the 4-day long festival.

All Photos By: Gurdeep Pandher

Visiting photographer captures stunning photos of an injured fox in Whitehorse

An injured fox in Whitehorse | Photo: Natasha Marie

On my maiden voyage to the Yukon, about 20 minutes into my first walk to the salmon run, I came across this sweetie limping down the road by the dam, coxed her into a treed area and she lay down right in front of me happy to put on a show and pose willingly for my camera.

An injured fox in Whitehorse | Photo: Natasha Marie
An injured fox in Whitehorse | Photo: Natasha Marie

I will never forget my first trip to the Yukon!

An injured fox in Whitehorse | Photo: Natasha Marie
An injured fox in Whitehorse | Photo: Natasha Marie

Another Yukon Beauty: Pelly River

Another Yukon Beauty: Pelly River | Photo: Gurdeep Pandher

The Pelly river of the Yukon originates west of the Mackenzie Mountains and flows 530 km (329 miles) long through the south central Yukon. The Pelly has two main tributaries, the Ross and Macmillan rivers.

The river was named by Robert Campbell in honour of Sir John Henry Pelly, governor of the Hudson’s Bay Company. The restored Hudson’s Bay Company trading post of Fort Selkirk is at the juncture of the Pelly and Yukon Rivers.

A photo that tells Dawson City’s golden past!

This photo tells many stories! Photo: Gurdeep Pandher

This copy of the Dawson Daily News decorates the cabin of the Yukon’s famous poet Robert W. Service in Dawson City. The paper stays on his personal writing desk in the cabin, it brings back many memories of the famous Gold Rush era. It tells many stories about Dawson’s life, culture, and much more.

Under the main headline “Klondike’s Gold Output Now Leaping Up” and subheading “Yield this year estimated at $5,500,000″; it tells more, “Big increase over the yield of last year. Total gold shipments from Dawson, embracing yield from the various nearby camps reaches the magnificent sum of $164,000,000. More new creeks being opened. Klondike only old camp steadily increasing in output. Vast deposits and modern equipment bringing up the yield. Splendid showing for the fifteenth anniversary of the biggest strike world ever knew.”

A wonder-town in Photos: This place has everything to offer!

Some just call it a nature-town and some call it their whole life. Those who live here permanently are blessed and those who lived here previously are either nostalgic or feel proud of that they were here before. Remoteness of this country helped many to sparkle their inner creativity to the best. Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
Some just call it a nature-town and some call it their whole life. Those who live here permanently are blessed and those who lived here previously are either nostalgic or feel proud of that they were here before. Remoteness of this country helped many to sparkle they inner creativity to the best. Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
Some just call it a nature-town and some call it their whole life. Those who live here permanently are blessed and those who lived here previously are either nostalgic or feel proud of that they were here before. Remoteness of this country helped many to sparkle their inner creativity to the best. Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
Thick and green forest around the town is like a cozy nest to the residents. Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
Thick and green forest around the town is like a cozy nest to the residents. Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
Flowers and flags welcome everyone outside Whitehorse's main recreational facility called Canada Games Centre: Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
Flowers and flags welcome everyone outside Whitehorse’s main recreational facility called Canada Games Centre: Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
An aerial view of mesmerizing Yukon river waters. Photo: Gurdeep Pandher
An aerial view of mesmerizing Yukon river waters. Photo: Gurdeep Pandher